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Fort Frederick Visit
October 23, 2004

Photo Gallery

Train Wallpapers

Big Pool on the C&O Canal

Big Pool Photo Gallery

Weverton Branch of the B&O

Brunswick Railroad Days

Martinsburg B&O Roundhouse

Martinsburg B&O Roundhouse Continued

Martinsburg B&O Roundhouse History

Fort Fredericia

Fort Frederick October 23, 2004

Fort Frederick Photo Gallery

Scottish Heritage Day at Fort King George

Plum Orchard February 2007

Darien GA March 2006

Darien Photos March 2006

Kissing Bridges of Frederick County

Cherry Blossoms in Washington, D.C. 2005

Seneca Stone Cutting Mill Index Page

Seneca Stone Cutting Mill

Weverton Industrial Village

Weverton Industrial Village - Revisited

Two Trails

LHSA Meeting October 2007

Letchworth State Park

George Eastman House

1st Digital Camera

Chairman Leica Camera

Cathedral of St. Francis of Assisi

Bandelier National Monument

St. Marys Kingfish Classic 2007

Train Wallpapers

Big Pool on the C&O Canal

Big Pool Photo Gallery

Weverton Branch of the B&O

Brunswick Railroad Days

Martinsburg B&O Roundhouse

Martinsburg B&O Roundhouse Continued

Martinsburg B&O Roundhouse History

Fort Fredericia

Fort Frederick October 23, 2004

Fort Frederick Photo Gallery

Scottish Heritage Day at Fort King George

Plum Orchard February 2007

Darien GA March 2006

Darien Photos March 2006

Kissing Bridges of Frederick County

Cherry Blossoms in Washington, D.C. 2005

Seneca Stone Cutting Mill Index Page

Seneca Stone Cutting Mill

Weverton Industrial Village

Weverton Industrial Village - Revisited

Two Trails

LHSA Meeting October 2007

Letchworth State Park

George Eastman House

1st Digital Camera

Chairman Leica Camera

Cathedral of St. Francis of Assisi

Bandelier National Monument

St. Marys Kingfish Classic 2007

I knew something was different when I drove onto the grounds of Fort Frederick, Maryland. There was a different look from the photos on the Internet.

There were tents and campfires in front of the Fort, but they were unlike any Boy Scout tents that I had seen in 50 years or so. As it turned out, they were the tents of the Union Troops (Yankees to all Southerners) who had gathered to stage a skirmish re-enactment as well as take part in the Fort Frederick Candlelight Tour.

In addition to the two companies of Union Troops, there were 4 or 5 Confederate Troops located some distance away from the tents. When asked about the discrepancy, the Confederate Officer said that it was “so the fight would be even.” Attitudes have not changed in 150 years.

Walking through the Union campground was very instructive.

Women and children, in period costume, were in the camp; one of the women was the “surgeon/nurse” who could help out with real or re-enactment injuries. Remembering what I had read of Civil War medicine, I declined their very courteous invitation to see for myself.

The cooking was done with the tools and utensils used during the Civil War. They had one fire set up with an “Ohio stove” fitted above the fire pit. In essence, it was a piece of metal that formed a hood above the fire with a pipe on one end that was the chimney. One end of the fire pit was open to put in wood and let oxygen in; the other was blocked with earth to keep the heat in. Cooking pots were placed on top of the metal hood – the first heated countertop!!!

Since I mentioned the tents earlier, I have to say that they were different. Instead of the nylon mesh, high-tech tents of today; they were beige canvas with wooden poles and wooden pegs. To keep a draft from coming under the sides, straw was arranged around the tent. Actually, they looked very comfortable.

Of course, what would a re-enactment be without shooting those black-powder, percussion-cap rifles and pistols? And shoot they did! With the few Confederates (woefully outnumbered) in the roles of scouts, the Union troops attacked and defeated them in two different battles (with the same actors). It was all in good fun and after the battle(s), both sides congregated and congratulated each other.

Fort Frederick was everything it was made out to be; and a worthwhile trip by itself. As you walk through the front gates, you are intimidated by the size and solidity of the walls surrounding you – as the designer meant for you to be. The reconstructed barracks on both sides are well-done and have people there to explain the ways the soldiers lived as well as how they were supplied and maintained. The fort itself is situated in rolling hills that, in the autumn, are a painter’s palate of color. The ground rolls down to the CSX tracks, then to the C&O Canal (the downstream end of Big Pool) and finally to the Potomac River.

The candlelight tour that they had this year was a first for them. During the tour, they took the group from one tableau to another. In each tableau, the actors were in period costume and performing actions that were particular to that period. Inside the Fort, we started with a group of British soldiers during the French and Indian Wars in their barracks settling down for the night. One person was cleaning a rifle; another was playing the flute (or recorder); and the others were playing a card game. We moved to the second barracks where one of the women of the fort was talking to one of the merchants about getting the supplies from Annapolis.

Outside the Fort captured British Soldiers from the Revolutionary War were working at a farm.

Moving around the perimeter of the Fort, we ran across some Confederate scouts trying to find a weakness in the Union positions. Then we went into the Union Army camp where we were treated to a changing of the guard, some medical activity (making me even happier I had declined earlier), and some camp activity.

Quite a day at the Fort; and quite a Fort and history lesson.
 

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Copyright © 2013 SamLindsey.com.  All rights reserved.

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Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited